Musth

Musth

Elephants in musth often discharge a thick tar-like secretion called temporin from the temporal ducts on the sides of the head. Musth is linked to sexual arousal or establishing dominance, but this relationship is far from clear. Wild bulls in musth often produce a characteristic low, pulsating rumbling noise (known as “musth rumble”) which can be heard by other elephants for considerable distances. The rumble has been shown to prompt attraction and reply vocalizations from cows in heat, but silent avoidance behaviour from other bulls (particularly juveniles) and non-receptive females, suggesting an evolutionary benefit to advertising the musth state.
Info source URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musth

Preen

Preen

The African darter, sometimes called the snakebird, is a water bird of sub-Saharan Africa. The male is mainly glossy black with white streaking, but females and immature birds are browner. The African darter differs in appearance from the American darter most recognisably by its thin white lateral neck stripe against a rufous background colour. The pointed bill should prevent confusion with cormorants. It is an 80 cm long cormorant-like fish-eating species with a very long neck, like other anhingas.
Info source URL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_darter

Expanse

Expanse

Robberg, situated 8km south of Plettenberg Bay on the Garden Route, is not only a nature reserve but also a national monument and World Heritage Site. Rocks from this region date back 120 million years to the break-up of Gondwanaland and evidence of middle and later Stone Age inhabitation has been found in a few of the caves along the peninsula. Visitors can find out more at the Nelson Bay Cave interpretive centre.
Info source URL: https://www.capenature.co.za/reserv…/robberg-nature-reserve/