Dense

Described best by local author Dalene Matthee in her series of books set in the forest, Knysna Forest is beautiful, bestrewn with forest walks and hiking trails that allow visitors to explore its perimeters. Knysna Forest, in some places so dense it borders on impenetrable, is a marvellous mix of ancient trees, both local and exotic. Tree ferns, creepers, flowers and the elusive Knysna lourie, its call heard more often than it is seen, are also part of the forest. The thick canopy of ironwood, stinkwood, Outeniqua yellowwood, real yellowwood, Cape holly, white pear, wild fig, milkwood, Cape beech, bastard saffron, assegai and kamassi trees covers 568 square kilometres between the Krom River and Mossel Bay, sprawling across the southern slopes of the Outeniqua Mountains. Together with the Amatole forests, further inland, it makes up Africa’s southernmost Afromontane forest. Today this thick, sweeping forest rich with birdlife and a collection of animals that include the endemic Knysna dwarf chameleon is protected.
Info source: https://www.sa-venues.com/attractionsgr/knysna-forest.php
=========
The photo was taken during October 2016 at Garden of Eden, Knysna, Western Cape, South Africa.

Dense

Unique

The striking black and white colours of the coat of the Burchell’s zebra are breathtaking. The patterns formed by these stripes are unique to each individual; which is why you will hear people say that no two zebras are completely the same. Burchell’s zebra, which is also known as the plains zebra, has black and white stripes all over its body with only a few or fading stripes on the legs. Each zebra has unique stripes that can be used as an identification character to distinguish between individuals – similar to fingerprints in humans. The stripes on the sides run down and join under the belly. Burchell’s zebra can be mistaken for the mountain zebra, but the stripes on the legs (fading stripes in Burchell’s zebra vs. clear stripes on mountain zebra) and belly are distinct (in the mountain zebra, the belly is all white with no stripes). Burchell’s zebra also have smaller ears when compared to those of the mountain zebra. There is a short mane down the back of the neck. The tail has long black hair at the end. Males are slightly larger than the females, and they have a narrow black stripe running vertically between their hind legs. In females, this stripe is wider. Males grow to between 1.35 and 1.37 m at the shoulder and their weight is between 290 and 340 kg, while females weigh about 260 kg. Info source: https://www.sanbi.org/animal-of-the-week/burchells-zebra/

Unique

Why good content leads to more bookings

We know you have a business to run, and the last thing you feel you have time for is writing a daily blog, or launching an Instagram campaign for your property. That’s OK. But making sure your website is content-rich – great photos, location detail, activity guides and FAQs (frequently asked questions) – will go a long way towards keeping potential guests on your site, positioning yourself as a local expert and, keeping your site on the first page of online searches.
Article courtesy of Nightsbridge

Segaia Bush Retreat